In The News

The most combative exchange between the Assembly and the Department of Finance centered around the impact of the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) in the San Joaquin Valley.  Assemblyman Devon J. Mathis (R-Visalia) said some projections have estimated a loss of up to $2 billion.  “Have you guys done any projections on the crop loss due to the implications of SGMA?” Mathis asked, citing a potential 30 percent decline in productivity. “If the San Joaquin Valley becomes a dust bowl because of loss of water due to SGMA [and] environmental regulations…and our row croppers don’t plant, your entire budget could be shot. Is that on your radar?”
A shiny white mobile van was wheeled into the parking lot at Mountain View Health Center last Friday morning, December 13. It was adorned with a large red bow and ribbon which gave it the appearance of a Christmas present to the community from Kern Valley Healthcare District (KVHD).
Inyo County’s representatives,   State Senator Andreas Borgeas and Assemblyman Devon Mathis, recently recognized Northern Inyo Healthcare District for its designation as the Healthcare District of the Year by the Association of California Healthcare Districts. Mathis, representing California’s 26th Assembly District, visited the District to present the NIHD Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Kevin S. Flanigan, MD MBA, with a framed Assembly Resolution. Borgeas, representing California’s 8th Senate District, had an approved State Senate Certificate delivered by Field Representative Dana  Jorgensen.
“This measure has a lot of repercussions and we should respect the will of the people,” Assemblyman Devon Mathis said. “As of late, it feels like California has forgotten about its duty to its citizens.”
“Now that this nonsense is over with, it would be great to see Democrats focus on the actual problems facing Californians,” Assemblyman Devon Mathis (R-Visalia) said in a press statement. “When they passed the SB 27, Democrats proved they never let the Constitution get in the way of wasting taxpayer dollars or trying to silence those who disagree with them. Thank you to the Supreme Court for striking down this illegal voter suppression effort and upholding our nation’s laws and values. Despite what Democrat lawmakers would like to believe, California is still subject to the United States Constitution.”
Assembly Republican Whip Devon Mathis of Visalia issued the following statement following the court's decision. When they passed the SB 27, Democrats proved they never let the Constitution get in the way of wasting taxpayer dollars or trying to silence those who disagree with them. Thank you to the Supreme Court for striking down this illegal voter suppression effort and upholding our nation’s laws and values. Despite what Democrat lawmakers would like to believe, California is still subject to the United States Constitution. Now that this nonsense is over with, it would be great to see Democrats focus on the actual problems facing Californians.
Eighty-two of 120 legislators failed the scorecard while only 25 got a grade of “A.” Of these, 15 legislators received the coveted and difficult to achieve perfect score in 2019: Assemblymembers Bill Brough, Vince Fong, Tom Lackey, Devon Mathis, Melissa Melendez, Jay Obernolte, and Randy Voepel, and state Senators Pat Bates, Ling-Ling Chang, Shannon Grove, Brian Jones, Jim Nielsen, Jeff Stone and Scott Wilk.
“The California state budget breaks a record, tops $220 billion, but we also have to remember California has a staggering number of homeless people compared with the rest of the country,” said Mathis. “The homeless population last year was almost 130,000, nearly a quarter of the national total, federal data showed. Homelessness is also a more visible part of life in California. A vast majority of its homeless people are unsheltered, living under freeways, in parks and on the street.”
Meanwhile, Asm. Devon Mathis (R–Visalia) noted that despite a generous budget proposal, it lacked in one key category for Valley residents: water. “While our population has grown dramatically, we have not built a new reservoir in decades,” Mathis said in a statement. “We need to make investments in our water infrastructure that increase storage, help people conserve and improve our ability to weather the next drought.”